Everything you can accomplish with Photoshop on iPad, and what is still lacking
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It’s no small feat to fit Photoshop into an iPad app. This is not the first time the Photoshop brand has been used in a mobile app, but these applications are quite different from the desktop version of Photoshop. With the release of Photoshop for iPad, a tablet-optimized version of the application, that’s all about to change.
Even though the iPad version of Photoshop isn’t an exact replica of the desktop version, it’s the closest mobile app to Photoshop in terms of interface and feel. Starting with only a few of the most frequently used features is Adobe’s way of establishing a foundation for feature parity across all versions.
Currently, the mobile version of Photoshop is only accessible for iPads running iOS 13.1 or later. Using an Apple Pencil instead of a mouse makes it much simpler to choose an item or draw on an image. Tablets have the obvious benefit of being smaller than computers.
Creative Cloud customers who already have Photoshop on their desktops may get it for free on their iPads. What if you don’t already have an iPad? Is the investment worthwhile? Before you start using Photoshop on an iPad, here are a few things you should know.

  • When will Photoshop be available on the iPad?On November 4, 2019, Adobe launched Photoshop for the iPad, after previewing the software last year.
  • Photoshop on the iPad includes the following features:Layers are what make Photoshop what it is today.
  • If you want to go back to your home screen, undo or redo any changes, access your cloud storage settings, or save any files, you may do so from a header in the iPad’s menu bar.
  • Think of it as an alternative to keyboard shortcuts — the touch shortcut.
  • Because of the touchscreen interface, several gesture controls are hidden from view.

When will Photoshop be available on the iPad?

On November 4, 2019, Adobe launched Photoshop for the iPad, after previewing the software last year. Early versions of the app will need more work before they incorporate all of the desktop version’s capabilities. While Adobe intends to implement these functionalities in the future, no specific dates have been announced. Waiting for a certain feature can be in your best interest.

Compared to Photoshop for desktop computers and for the iPad,

Most commonly used retouching and masking tools are included in this first release, but some important ones aren’t: dodge and burn are nowhere to be found. If your favourite features aren’t accessible yet, a little nitpicking may help speed up the process of bringing them to the masses.

Listing what’s included is a lot simpler than going over what’s left out, which may be tedious. Photoshop on the iPad includes the following features:

Layers are what makes Photoshop what it is today. Fortunately, Photoshop layers are still supported on the iPad. New layers can be created, layer masks can be applied, the opacity of a layer can be altered, and the blending mode may be altered. Layers can also be removed, a layer loaded as a selection, and masks added, subtracted, or intersected to the selection.No layer effects or smart filters are available for layers at this time. There is a reduced view of layers and a more comprehensive layer panel for tablets, so traversing layers could be different.

Additional layers, such as adjustment layers, let you deal with modifications such as brightness and contrast, levels, hue and saturation, and colour balance, in addition to ordinary layers. It’s possible to add a clipped adjustment layer by tapping on the “Add Clipped Adjustment” option in a layer’s properties panel, or by holding and selecting the option from the menu.

Everything you can accomplish with Photoshop on iPad, and what is still lacking

In many cases, a touchscreen interface is more convenient than a mouse when it comes to making difficult choices. You may use the lasso, rapid selection, rectangle, circular selection, or Select Subject to create selections in Photoshop for iPad. Once you’ve made a selection, it’s still possible to make it into a mask or flip it. The Refine Brush (included in the More menu of the Selection Toolbox at the bottom of the screen) may be used to fine-tune selections, but it lacks the extensive set of choices available in the Select and Mask window on the desktop. The magnetic lasso and select objects are absent.

Clone and healing tools are already included, but picture editors will have to wait for more complex features like frequency separation and dodge and burn tools. Retouching: Create dodge and burn layers instead if you choose.

The following are the essentials: The initial version includes the paintbrush, text tool, fill tool, and gradient tool. There are various tools for cropping and transforming images. A few more steps are required to rotate the canvas with the crop tool.

In addition to capabilities like curves, content-aware fill and warp tools, as well as basic image scaling options, there are many more functions that are currently lacking. Aside from the Gaussian Blur, no other filters are included in this list either. For the time being, the iPad version of Photoshop is best seen as a supplement to the desktop version rather than a replacement.

A Beginner’s Guide to Photoshop for iPad

Anyone who has used Photoshop on a desktop computer will have no trouble getting started with Photoshop on the iPad. In order to make better use of the available screen real estate, the interface has been overhauled and shrunk to its most basic form. For those who prefer to use a mouse and keyboard, the controls work in a slightly different way. For the app’s usability, this is a positive feature. However, certain tools may need further research at first.

To access related tools, hold down on icons with a triangle in the corner. When a tool is chosen, a “Tool Choices” bar will open up next to the toolbar, which includes a “Triple Dot” menu that tends to obscure more options. The selection tool, for example, has a little menu at the bottom that provides further possibilities. You may reposition these mini menus by dragging them with your mouse. If you want to go back to your home screen, undo or redo any changes, access your cloud storage settings, or save any files, you may do so from a header in the iPad’s menu bar.

Adobe’s new Cloud Documents feature is a key component of the mobile editing process. You may now save files in the cloud and view them from your desktop at a later time. As long as you have enough Creative Cloud storage to save your documents, you may use cloud documents. The PSD files may be rather huge, so be prepared for a lengthy sync time.

The power of gesture is in the hands of the user.

Have you seen that strange circle lingering above your image? Think of it as an alternative to keyboard shortcuts — the touch shortcut. If you’re using the paintbrush, for example, you may switch to the eraser tool by touching and holding that circle. In addition to touching and holding the centre of the circle, you may also tap and slide your finger to the outside border of the circle to activate a secondary touch shortcut. It’s also possible to move the touch shortcut by tapping, holding, and dragging it. When the touch shortcut is engaged, a blue box in the top right corner of the tool displays an explanation of what the touch shortcut accomplishes.

You may use the touch shortcut to scale the crop proportionately, choose from the centre of the elliptical marquee, or add to a selection, all of which are absent without a keyboard. If you often use the shift key for a certain operation, the touch shortcuts definitely have a shortcut for it. Touch shortcuts may be seen here or by pressing on the Question Mark icon and choosing View Touch Shortcuts inside the app.

Because of the touchscreen interface, several gesture controls are hidden from view. As with desktop keyboard shortcuts, once you get the hang of gesture controls, you should be able to work more quickly. There are a number of popular gesture controllers, such as:

Tap with two fingers to undo:

Tap using three fingers instead of two.

It’s time to have a look around: Use two fingers to move the cursor.

Press down with two fingers to enlarge.

The following is what it looks like when you zoom in all the way: With one finger, double-tap

Rotate: Rotate the screen by placing two fingers on it and moving them in opposite directions. If you use the laptop touchpad to rotate the canvas, the canvas will revert to its original position when you reopen the file. Use the crop and rotate tools for a permanent rotation.

Is Photoshop for the iPad worth the investment for you?

If you already possess an iPad and have a subscription to Creative Cloud, there is no excuse not to test out Photoshop on your iPad. It’s a mixed bag if you’re looking to take your Photoshop process on the go by purchasing an iPad. Many features are still lacking from the iPad app that might be deal-breakers for high-end professional usage, so you might want to wait. However, if you don’t mind a Photoshop app for the iPad, it could be a good addition to your creative tools.

Business photo created by prostooleh – www.freepik.com

Business photo created by prostooleh – www.freepik.com

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